Paul Stewart

Antiques Number Two

More exploration in panorama

The Cumbrian Antiques Centre

My local antiques outlet here in Brampton offers some great opportunity for imaging in confined spaces.

A slightly different technique in presentation and preparation prior to the blending. I’m remapping the original panorama. Picking an object of my choosing to be in the centre of the image wether it is above or below the horizon.

Selecting points in those regions of the image create a wave in the panorama projection and frankly, it looks wrong on a single image.

Here is an example of the imaging with corrected vertical and horizontal control points…

Antiques Number One

Antiques Number One – Paul Stewart

And below with points chosen by myself adhering to no rules of the perpendicular whatsoever.

Antiques Number Two

Antiques Number Two – Paul Stewart

It’s against the generally accepted practise of maintaining strict vertical and horizontals but given that this is aimed at a final print this has, at least in my opinion, worked successfully. Offering a different dynamic and method to consider in the preparation for the final blending process.

There is tremendous detail in these images and are best appreciated as large prints. You’ll find sailing boats, knights in armour, grand father clocks, tennis rackets, fancy plates, price tags and even the odd potted plant (actually there two).

Check out some earlier questions on composition in panorama here: http://mouthtosource.net/portfolio/average-exploring-composition-in-panorama/

Or AVERAGE.pdf that has much more detail on the method to create the final image.

Cumbrian Antiques Centre, Brampton, United Kingdom
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